Current and Ex PhD students

These are some of my current and past PhD students with topics and links to their webpages.


Current PhD Students

  • Shatha Alruwaili
    Shatha will be working on a topic in Arabic syntax in LFG. She started the 4 year Doctoral Programme in October 2013, having completed an MA in Applied Linguistics in the Department. Email sfsalr AT essex.ac.uk

  • Paloma Carretero
    Paloma is working on Spanish dative pronominals (both selected and non-selected dative arguments), from the perspective of LFG. She started in October 2012, having completed a Masters in Linguistics here. She is funded by the ESRC and jointly supervised by Andrew Spencer. Mail pcarre AT essex.ac.uk

  • Shaimaa ElSadek
    Shaimaa is working on aspects of verbal complementation in Egyptian Cairene Arabic (ECA), from the perspective of LFG. She started in October 2012, having completed a Masters in Linguistics at the University of Alexandria. Mail sesels AT essex.ac.uk

  • Maris Camilleri
    Maris is working on aspects of verbal complementation in Maltese, from the perspective of LFG. She started in October 2011, having completed an MRes in Linguistics in the Department. Mail mcamil AT essex.ac.uk

  • Budour Al Sharifi
    Budour is working on the syntax of Arabic adjectives in LFG. She started in October 2008, having completed an MA in Linguistics in the Department. Budour's homepage and email yaalsh AT essex.ac.uk


  • Past Students

  • Yasir Alotaibi
    Yasir started in October 2010 following a 4 year Doctoral Programme in Linguistics, and was awarded his PhD in June 2014. His thesis is entitled Conditional Sentences in Modern Standard Arabic and the Taif Dialect. He has returned to a lectureship in the Arabic Language Department in Salman Bin Abdulaziz University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

  • Muhammad AlZaidi
    Muhammad started in October 2010, and was awarded his PhD in June 2014. His thesis is entitled Information Structure and Intonation in Hijazi Arabic . He has returned to a lectureship in the English Department at Taif University in Saudi Arabia.

  • Ahmad Al Sharif
    Ahmad's thesis is on Negation in Arabic in LFG. He started in October 2008, having completed an MA in Linguistics in the Department.

  • Farah Akbar
    Farah's thesis (2013) is entitled Malay Morphosyntax: The role of meN-. The framework of reference is LFG and the Generative Lexicon. She started in October 2006, having completed an MA in Computational Linguistics in the Department. Farah is currently a lecturer at Universiti Sains Malaysia, in Malaysia.

  • Kakia Chatsiou
    Kakia's thesis is concerned with the syntax of Modern Greek relative clauses, including free relatives and non-restrictive relatives, with particular reference to resumption phenomena. The framework is LFG. She started in October 2005 and handed in her dissertation in September 2009, her doctorate was awarded in July 2010. She is currently working in the Data Archive at the University, and was previously Digital Curator for the Endangered Languages programme at SOAS. Kakia's homepage and email achats AT essex.ac.uk

  • Despina Kazana
    Despina's thesis is on agreement and coordination, focussing on the NP in Modern Greek, within the LFG framework. Despina was a full-time student in 2004-5 and then transferred to part-time. She worked at Suffolk College during part of her time as a PhD student. She is currently working as a civil servant in Greece. Her thesis can be downloaded HERE

  • Maria Flouraki
    Maria completed a thesis in October 2004 on tense and aspect in Modern Greek within the framework of HPSG, having started in October 2000. She has been working as a secondary school teacher in Crete and is currently a teaching fellow in Syntax and Semantics at SOAS. Her email is mf44 AT soas.ac.uk or mflour AT hotmail.com

  • Natalia Brines-Moya
    Natalia completed a thesis on the causative/inchoative alternation in Spanish within the framework of HPSG in October 2000. She then moved to a job in Natural Language Processing in Berlin and is now working as a freelance translator in Spain.

  • Ana Luis
    Ana completed a thesis on the interface between morphology and syntax, working mainly in Paradigm Function Morpology, with LFG as the syntactic framework of reference. I was involved in her thesis to advise on the LFG. Ana teaches at the University of Coimbra, in the Faculty of English. aluis@ci.uc.pt

  • Masako Ohara completed her thesis on Japanese Light Verbs in LFG in 2000. Masako currently holds a lectureship in Japan.
  • Valia Kordoni
    completed her thesis on Modern Greek Psychological Predicates in HPSG in 2002. Valia previously worked as a lecturer in Computational Linguistics at the University of the Saarland in Saarbruecken. and is now at the Humboldt University in Berlin.
  • Salah Al-Najem Salah Al-Najem completed his PhD in 1998 on A Computational Approach to Arabic Morphology, using the DATR. Salah is currently working at the University of Kuwait in the Department of Arabic. Salah's webpage and email alnajem@alnajem.com
  • Andrew Bredenkamp Andrew completed his PhD, entitled Towards a Binding Theory for HPSG, in 1996. He is currently director of Acrolinx, a spinoff company from the DFKI. Andrew's webpage and email andrewb@acrolinx.com
  • Josef van Genabith Josef is currently Professor and Head of Multilingual Technologies at the DKFI (German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence), Saarbruecken and was previously a member of staff in the School of Computer Applications, Dublin City University. He wrote his thesis (completed 1993) on implementing DRT. He was very much involved in LFG treebanking, together with his colleague (and Essex graduate) Andy Way before moving on to a number of other applied computational areas. Josef's webpage and email

  • Stella Markantonatou Stella wrote her thesis in 1993 on Nominalisation in Modern Greek, providing an analysis using the Lexical Mapping Theory of LFG. Stella is currently working at the ILSP in Athens. She has coordinated a number of projects funded by the Greek government, including a style checker for controlled Greek, and a project on shallow parsing (using FSNs) for Greek. ILSP Homepage and Stella's email: marks@ilsp.gr

  • Bertrade Banoum (formerly MBom) Bertrade is currently a member of staff in the Department of African and African-American Studies at the City University of New York. She wrote her thesis on Tense and Aspect in Basaa (Bantu, Cameroon).


  • Louisa Sadler,
    (louisa@essex.ac.uk),
    Department of Language and Linguistics,
    University of Essex,
    Wivenhoe Park,
    Colchester, UK.

    Created November 1996; last update 2/7/2014