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SCOTTISH PARTY LEADERSHIP ELECTIONS 1990-2015

 

Scottish Labour Party (Leader)
Scottish Labour Party (Deputy Leader)
Scottish Conservatives
Scottish Liberal Democrats

 

Scottish Labour Party Leadership Elections 1998-2015

1998   19 September    
Electoral college        
Donald Dewar Elected unopposed after being only candidate to be nominated
         
         
2000   22 October    
Ad hoc ballot Votes %    
Henry McLeish 44 55.0    
Jack McConnell 36 45.0    
         
         
2001   17 November    
Ad hoc ballot        
Jack McConnell Elected unopposed after being only candidate to be nominated
         
         
2007   14 September    
Electoral college        
Wendy Alexander Elected unopposed after being only candidate to secure sufficient nominations
         
         
2008   13 September  
Electoral college (1/3-1/3-1/3) Elected members % Individual members % Affiliates % Total %
First count        
Iain Gray 53.7 45.2 39.2 46.0
Cathy Jamieson 26.8 30.8 42.3 33.3
Andy Kerr 19.5 24.0 18.6 20.7
         
Second count        
Iain Gray 67.6 57.3 48.5 57.8
Cathy Jamieson 32.4 42.7 51.5 42.2
         
         
2011   17 December  
Electoral college (1/3-1/3-1/3) Elected members % Individual members % Affiliates % Total %
Johann Lamont 53.3 36.6 65.4 51.8
Ken Macintosh 41.3 53.1 26.4 40.3
Tom Harris 3.2 10.3 8.2 8.0 
         
         
2014   13 December  
Electoral college (1/3-1/3-1/3) Elected members % Individual members % Affiliates % Total %
Jim Murphy 67.1 60.4 39.8 55.8
Neil Findlay 20.3 32.7 52.0 35.0
Sarah Boyack 12.7 6.9 8.2 9.2

 

2015 15  August
All-member ballot %
Kezia Dugdale 72.1
Ken Macintosh 27.9

 

Notes:
1998-2011: ‘Leader’ understood as leader of the Labour Party group in the Scottish parliament. The new leader to be elected in 2011 will, for the first time, become leader of the entire Scottish Labour Party.
1998: Dewar elected unopposed, securing 99.8% at a special meeting of electoral college delegates, CLPs, unions, socialist societies and MPs, MEPs and candidates for Holyrood participating.
2000: Ad hoc ballot of Labour MSPs and members of Labour’s Scottish Executive because not enough time to organise full electoral-college vote, as Scotland Act set 28-day deadline for choosing new first minister.
2001: Ad hoc ballot of Labour MSPs and members of Labour’s Scottish Executive because not enough time to organise full electoral-college vote. McConnell secured 97% of vote, with one MSP voting against him and four MSPs and two MEPs not attending the vote.
2007: Alexander secured nominations of 41 out of 46 Labour MSPs (89.1%). Left-wing candidate, Bill Butler, failed to secure necessary nominations of 12.5% of Labour MSPs.
2008-14: Elected members section consisted of Labour MSPs, MPs and MEPs. Postal ballots of individual members in individual members and affiliates sections.

2014: Candidates had to be nominated by at least 12.5% of Labour MSPs (38), MPs (40) and MEPs (2). Ten nominations required from any two categories of MSPs, MPs and MEPs. Murphy received 43 nominations, Findlay 12 and Boyack 10.
2015: All-member ballot includes individual party members, affiliated supporters (trade unionists paying their political levies directly to the Labour Party) and registered supporters (members of the public paying a £3.00 fee and who have signed their agreement to Labour's values). Candidates must be an MP, MSP or MEP for a Scottish constituency. All candidates must secure nominations of 15% (i.e. seven) of Scottish MPs, MSPs and MEPs. No requirement for nominations to be spread across at least two categories of parliamentarians. Dugdale secured 31 nominations and Macintosh eight. Up to 15,000 party members and 6,000 affiliated and registered supporters eligible to vote. Absolute numbers of votes cast for each candidate were not released by the party.


Sources:
J. Allardyce, ‘Hands up who didn’t vote for Donald’, Scotland on Sunday, 20 September 1998; K. Scott, ‘Dewar’s successor to seek more power for parliament’, Guardian, 23 October 2000; A. Crow and V. Rodrick, ‘McConnell romps home in one-horse race after Labour panic over “sleaze”’, Daily Mail, 18 November 2001; BBC, ‘Alexander leads Scottish Labour’, BBC News, 14 September 2007; Scottish Labour Party HQ, private communication, 9 June 2011; Scottish Labour Party, 'New Scottish Labour leader and deputy leader announced', n.d., available at http://www.scottishlabour.org.uk/newleader; BBC, 'MP Jim Murphy named Scottish Labour leader', BBC News, 13 December 2014; Scottish Labour, 'Nominations for Scottish Labour Leader and Deputy Leader', n.d., available at http://www.scottishlabour.org.uk/blog/entry/nominations-for-scottish-labour-leader-and-deputy-leader.; Scottish Labour, 'Leadership Results 2015', available at www.scottishlabour.org.uk/blog/entry/leadership-results-2015.

 

Scottish Labour Party Deputy Leadership Elections 2000-2015

2000   22 October    
Cathy Jamieson Elected unopposed after being only candidate to be nominated
         
         
2008   13 September  
Electoral college (1/3-1/3-1/3) Elected members % Individual members % Affiliates % Total %
Johann Lamont 74.0 54.9 51.6 60.2
Bill Butler 26.0 46.1 48.4 39.8
         
         
2011   17 December  
Electoral college (1/3-1/3-1/3) Elected members % Individual members % Affiliates % Total %
Anas Sarwar 66.7 61.0 25.6 51.1
Ian Davidson 13.3 25.4 61.1 33.3
Lewis MacDonald 20.0 13.6 13.3 15.6
         
         
2014   13 December  
Electoral college (1/3-1/3-1/3) Elected members % Individual members % Affiliates % Total %
Kezia Dugdale 85.9 66.3 36.4 62.9
Katy Clark 14.1 33.7 63.6 37.1

 

2015 15  August
  First count Second count
All-member ballot % %
Alex Rowley 37.4 55.5
Gordon Matheson 32.2 44.5
Richard Baker 30.4 -

Notes:
2014: Dugdale nominated by 51 MSPs, MPs and MEPs. Clark nominated by 11.
2015: Candidates required nominations of 15% of MPs, MSPs and MEPs for Scottish constituencies, or 15% of councillors for Scottish local authorities. Baker nominated by 14 MPs, MSPs and MEPs, Matheson by two and Rowley by ten. Baker nominated by 30 councillors, Matheson by 108 and Rowley by 74.

Sources: See under 'Scottish Labour Party Leadership Elections'

 

Scottish Conservative Party Leadership Elections 1998-2011

1998 6 September    
Ad hoc ballot Votes %    
David McLetchie 91 52.3    
Phil Gallie 83 47.7    
         
         
2005   2 November  
Annabel Goldie Declared leader after being only candidate to be nominated
         
         
2011 4 November
All-member ballot First count Second count
  Votes % Votes %
Ruth Davidson 2,278 40.1 2,983 55.2
Murdo Fraser 2,096 36.9 2,417 44.8
Jackson Carlaw 830 14.6 - -
Margaret Mitchell 472 8.3 - -
Non-transferable - - 276 (4.9)
Turnout: 63.4%        

 

Notes:
‘Leader’ is understood here as leader of the Conservative Party group in the Scottish parliament.
1998: Secret ballot at meeting of senior party officials, including Conservative candidates for the Scottish parliament, constituency chairmen, area officers and the party’s Scottish executive
2011: Candidates needed to be nominated by 100 individual party members. Postal ballot of individual party members in Scotland using alternative-vote system
† Goldie initially assumed the leadership on 31 October on an interim basis after David McLetchie’s resignation.


Sources: S. Goodwin, ‘Scottish Tories elect leader’, Independent, 7 September 1998; A. Macleod, ‘No contest as Scottish Tories go for Goldie’, Times, 3 November 2005; BBC, ‘Ruth Davidson elected new Scottish Conservative leader’, BBC News, 4 November 2011; S. Johnson, ‘Davidson edges out Fraser to lead Scottish Tories’, Daily Telegraph, 5 November 2011.

 

Scottish Liberal Democrat Leadership Elections 1992-2011

1992 19 April
Jim Wallace Declared leader after being only candidate to be nominated
     
     
2005 23 June
All-member ballot Votes %
Nicol Stephen 2,108 76.7
Mike Rumbles 642 23.3
Turnout: 65.3%    
     
     
2008 26 August
All-member ballot Votes %
Tavish Scott 1,450 59.0
Ross Finnie 568 23.1
Mike Rumbles 439 17.9
Turnout: 61%    
     
     
2011 11 May
William Rennie Declared leader after being only candidate to be nominated

 

Notes:
‘Leader’ is understood here as both leader of the Liberal Democrat group in the Scottish parliament (from 1999) and leader of the Scottish Liberal Democrat state party.
2005-2008: Postal ballot of individual members in Scotland using alternative-vote system


Sources: D. Fraser, ‘Stephen takes aim at Labour seats after party vote’, Glasgow Herald, 24 June 2005; R. Dinwoodie, ‘Tavish Scott takes LibDem gold’, Glasgow Herald, 27 August 2008; BBC, ‘William Rennie named new Scottish Lib Dem leader’, BBC News, 11 May 2011.


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